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WHAT IS IT? The Shroud of Turin is a linen cloth believed by some to have covered the buried body of Jesus Christ. Accounts of Jesus' followers wrapping his body with a linen cloth are mentioned in all four gospels (Matthew 27:59, Mark 15:46, Luke 23:53, John 19:40). The shroud, which has a known history dating back to 1353, is about 14-feet long by four feet wide. It is called the Shroud of Turin because it permanently resides in the city of Turin, Italy, though on occasion it is exhibited elsewhere. WHAT’S ON IT? The shroud bears markings that appear to be front and back impressions of a crucified man. Apparently, the cloth was folded over itself, one half above the man, the other half below. Interestingly, the man's wounds are consistent with the wounds inflicted upon Jesus during the torture He endured leading up to His crucifixion. There appear to be wounds around the hairline, matching the biblical description of the crown of thorns. Several small stripe-like wounds extend from the shoulders to the lower legs, matching the biblical description of His torture by whipping. There is also a wound in the area of the chest, which matches the description of the piercing wound inflicted on Jesus shortly after His death THE REALITY OF IT Jesus lived a perfect life, He died for the sins of mankind, He was raised from the dead, and then He ascended into heaven. By accepting him as Lord and Savior by grace through faith we are forgiven. Christians don't base these beliefs on the Shroud of Turin or any other ancient artifact. Rather, Christians accept these things because of a belief in the truthfulness of the Bible. The debate over the Shroud of Turin does remind us of one very important point, though. That is, the historicity of the Christian faith. Christianity is not just a set of rules by which Christians govern their lives. It's a relationship with a real God who entered human history as a mortal man, and died so that we might have everlasting life. WATCH TED TALK VIDEO WATCH TED TALK VIDEO
WHAT IS IT? The     Shroud     of     Turin     is     a     linen     cloth believed    by    some    to    have    covered    the buried    body    of    Jesus    Christ.    Accounts    of Jesus'   followers   wrapping   his   body   with   a linen     cloth     are     mentioned     in     all     four gospels   (Matthew   27:59,   Mark   15:46,   Luke 23:53,   John   19:40).   The   shroud,   which   has   a known   history   dating   back   to   1353,   is   about 14-feet   long   by   four   feet   wide.   It   is   called the       Shroud       of       Turin       because       it permanently    resides    in    the    city    of    Turin, Italy,    though    on    occasion    it    is    exhibited elsewhere.
WHAT’S ON IT? The   shroud   bears   markings   that   appear   to be     front     and     back     impressions     of     a crucified    man.    Apparently,    the    cloth    was folded   over   itself,   one   half   above   the   man, the    other    half    below.    Interestingly,    the man's    wounds    are    consistent    with    the wounds    inflicted    upon    Jesus    during    the torture    He    endured    leading    up    to    His crucifixion.    There    appear    to    be    wounds around   the   hairline,   matching   the   biblical description   of   the   crown   of   thorns.   Several small   stripe-like   wounds   extend   from   the shoulders   to   the   lower   legs,   matching   the biblical     description     of     His     torture     by whipping.   There   is   also   a   wound   in   the   area of      the      chest,      which      matches      the description   of   the   piercing   wound   inflicted on Jesus shortly after His death
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THE REALITY OF IT Jesus   lived   a   perfect   life,   He   died   for   the   sins of   mankind,   He   was   raised   from   the   dead, and    then    He    ascended    into    heaven.    By accepting   him   as   Lord   and   Savior   by   grace through     faith     we     are     forgiven.     Christians don't    base    these    beliefs    on    the    Shroud    of Turin    or    any    other    ancient    artifact.    Rather, Christians   accept   these   things   because   of   a belief    in    the    truthfulness    of    the    Bible.    The debate   over   the   Shroud   of   Turin   does   remind us   of   one   very   important   point,   though.   That is,     the     historicity     of     the     Christian     faith. Christianity   is   not   just   a   set   of   rules   by   which Christians   govern   their   lives.   It's   a   relationship with   a   real   God   who   entered   human   history as   a   mortal   man,   and   died   so   that   we   might have everlasting life.
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The Shroud and the Jew B A R R Y   S C H W O R T Z
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